Vegas Shooter Settlement Reached But They Don’t Want You To Know The Big ‘Why’

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On Wednesday, a judge banged the gavel approving an $800 million dollar settlement payout to the victims of the “deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. Everyone involved is breathing a heavy sigh of relief that the case is over. The checks can be written and more importantly the whole thing can be boxed up, put in storage and forgotten. Nearly three years after the massacre, authorities continue to insist they have no idea why Stephen Paddock did what he did. They know, they just don’t want you to know.

Settlement brings closure to the families

While this judicial settlement is wonderful news to the surviving victims, and the families of those not so fortunate, because it gives them a sense of closure – around 100 million Americans are disappointed. Folks who call themselves “canaries” know exactly why Stephen Paddock did what he did and they see officials blatantly covering it up. They’re desperately crying out for recognition, just as Stephen Paddock was.

At least one in four, perhaps as many as one in three, of the people reading this article now, have exactly the same medical condition that Stephen Paddock had. The vast majority of those afflicted never even heard of it. Companies like Procter & Gamble, Johnson & Johnson, and their competitors simply don’t want anyone to know that a condition commonly called “Multiple Chemical Sensitivity” even exists. It would make a huge dent in their corporate earnings if their customers started linking their multiple ailments to the convenient household products they surround themselves with. The $800 million settlement is peanuts to the hit major global corporations would take if people knew the truth.

When country music fans bought their tickets for the Route 91 Harvest country music festival held October 1, 2017, on the Las Vegas Strip. They had no idea that Stephen Paddock was preparing to murder as many of them as he could. By the end of the evening, “Fifty-eight people were killed and nearly 700 were wounded.” Paddock shot himself in the head. This settlement wraps the dirty mess up in a neat package, ties it with a bow and puts it in the closet to be forgotten. Everyone keeps lamenting the same lines Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo said during a press conference in 2018. “What we have been able to answer are the questions of who, what, when, where, and how. What we have not been able to answer definitively is the why Stephen Paddock committed this act.” They know. They just aren’t able to answer.

A special brain autopsy

The New York Times found out about the controversy in 2018, long before the settlement was arranged, and confirmed the key issues. They also swept every one of the conclusions under the rug. They confirm that Paddock didn’t have “a stroke, brain tumor or a number of other neurological disorders.” He did have “changes commonly seen in Americans of his age,” like “atherosclerosis — fatty plaques inside blood vessels that can impair circulation,” and “damage to the brain’s blood vessels resulting from high blood pressure.” Those things didn’t make him snap.

Dr. Hannes Vogel, director of neuropathology at Stanford University, personally examined what was left. “Scattered on the surfaces of his brain,” Vogel found “an abnormally high number of tiny deposits.” He notes they “tend to increase with age and accompany some neurological diseases.” They didn’t make him snap either but they provide the “smoking gun” to indicate what did cause him to snap. Frustration that nobody would take his Multiple Chemical Sensitivity seriously. The settlement paves the way to glossing it over forever.

When the tissues were dyed with a stain, under a microscope they showed “that certain sections of Mr. Paddock’s brain contained small spheres.” Those structures, made up mostly of carbohydrates, are known as corpora amylacea. “Most people would have them at that age, but not in that profusion,” Dr. Vogel said. “It’s a striking exaggeration of an age-related finding.” MCS would explain the profuse settlement of these structures in Paddock’s brain.

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A progressively debilitating disease

There is no known cure or treatment for the severe symptoms which are caused when certain people are exposed to everyday, ordinary, household products generally considered “safe” for humans. For those who are genetically predisposed, once a certain threshold of exposure is reached, the condition activates. Each and every exposure after that, to as little as 5 parts per billion of a triggering substance, can cause a life threatening reaction. Paddock had it. His condition had progressed to the point where he could no longer maintain his lifestyle. Like all too many of those with the same condition, with no support available, he took his own life. Unfortunately, to make a point, he took out 58 innocent people with him. It didn’t do any good because nobody wants to admit why he did it. The settlement will now be part of the coverup as it fades into history.

As the New York Times writes, “Paddock had complained to friends of feeling ill, in pain and fatigued.” His girlfriend Marilou Danley couldn’t wear makeup around him and described Paddock as “strongly reactive to smells.” There’s lots of other strong indicators that Paddock specifically had MCS. He was unable to renew his pilot’s license because he could no longer tolerate his blood pressure meds. He was losing his shirt at the gambling table because he couldn’t concentrate on what he was doing from the fumes in the environment. One casino which valued his business even washed his room carpets with fresh water before he checked in. This settlement will make all that evidence simply disappear.

Three research scientists who study the formation of corpora amylacea sat down with the Times. According to Troy Rohn, a professor of biology at Boise State University, “if you have high numbers of these, something’s not normal.” His colleagues explain, “the structures are akin to wastebaskets that contain remnants of broken-down cells or even infectious or hazardous substances.” To those with MCS “hazardous substances” are things like perfume, cleaning products, essential oils, incense, soaps, detergents and a myriad of other things most people take entirely for granted. Dr. Hyman Schipper, of McGill University, says finding the massive amounts of corpora amylacea in Paddock’s brain is “telling you something and it could be very important.” This settlement says just the opposite. It’s all over, move along, nothing to see here.

1 COMMENT

  1. The real issue is covering up an battack by a Moslem convert – to avoid a National (though needed) backlash.
    As for Paddocks medical condition. The medical condition may or mat not have exacerbated Paddocks apocalyptic desire to kill infidels in the great Satans Las Vegas

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