Details Emerge on Clinton State Dept

0
442
Clinton

All the way back in 2011, one of the State Department lawyers working for Hillary Clinton knew that the leak of sensitive classified documents was not “reckless.” In fact, they could have stopped the release but chose not to. The conversation just disclosed by Project Veritas confirmed that Julian Assange “meticulously” redacted the documents which were published behind his back without censorship by a third party.

Hillary Clinton could have stopped the presses

Julian Assange has been formally accused of “endangering US interests and assets” by “recklessly” publishing “unredacted US State Department diplomatic cables.” That’s a lie. The data had been hijacked from Assange, who reached out to Clinton about the breach.

As SputnikNews reports, “German lawyers explained to WikiLeaks that only the US State Department would have the legal standing to seek to prevent publication of the unredacted cables or prevent the existence of the password from being revealed to a wider audience as the cables technically belonged to them, and not WikiLeaks. ​However, the US State Department ultimately did not intervene via the courts.”

Assange did his best as a professional to “minimize possible harm while exposing illegal actions.” Others in his organization weren’t as scrupulous. Project Veritas just released an audio recording from 2011 between Julian Assange and a lawyer working with Hillary Clinton in the State Department.

“We have intelligence that the State Department database archive of 250,000 diplomatic cables, including the classified cables, is being spread around,” Assange warned. “We believe that within the next few days, it will become public.” The kicker was when he told attorney Cliff Johnson that “there may be some possibility to stop it.”

Wikileaks had no intention of releasing unredacted cables. “This is Daniel Domscheit-Berg, a previous employee that we suspended last August.” The rat had been sharing around “a link of the full unredacted diplomatic cables, which had been copied from the WikiLeaks website.”

It’s bad enough that that the “encrypted” files could be found online. Worse, “the password to the encrypted file was entrusted by Assange to Guardian journalist David Leigh.” The Australian reporter had the password but not the files and he was itching for “access to the entirety of the 250,000 documents.” The Clinton aide wasn’t happy.

The title of one of the chapters

David Leigh and associate Luke Harding revealed the secret password by “publishing the key as the title of one of the chapters in their book.” They were writing an expose about WikiLeaks.

You can hear the tension in the Clinton attorney’s voice when he asks, “does that mean that [Daniel Domschit-Berg] now [has] the ability…, without your control or authorization, to make this as available as they want?” Yep. “That’s correct”, Assange replies, adding “and there there’s no attempted redaction program and no attempted harm minimization.”

“There is an encrypted version of the materials on the internet somewhere that we do not control,” Assange explained. All you need to know is the “location of the material and its encryption key.” The only chance to keep the lid on national secrets was on the Clinton side. Preferably “before people start using the encryption key revealed by Leigh and Harding.”

The problem was WikiLeaks couldn’t do that on their own. Assange needed help from Hillary. “We have been calling the State Department and the embassy for over a day, trying to explain the urgency, and they have not called back other than this call.”

Assange explained to Johnson in excruciating detail “that WikiLeaks had attempted to stop the German news outlet Der Freitag from revealing the password to the unredacted cables that had been published by Harding and Leigh in their book.” Hillary Clinton had to pull the plug.

“Only the US State Department would have the legal standing to seek to prevent publication of the unredacted cables or prevent the existence of the password from being revealed to a wider audience as the cables technically belonged to them, and not WikiLeaks.” They didn’t. Assange and his team spent “9 months developing a careful plan to protect people at risk.” If anyone was reckless, it was Hillary Clinton’s State Department.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here